Geese

These are angry geese, mainly canadian gooses, Doing what angry gooses like to do…..

This friendly little family became the start of my love for these birds in 2010. I still connect with these parents and know and feed the offspring in this video, who are now full-grown.

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Allen discusses geese and ganders and covers topics including their characteristics, behavior, benefits and more. Allen also talks about all of the things you have to consider once a goose begins to lay her eggs.

Have a question for Allen? He’ll be checking in regularly, so be sure to leave your comments and questions below.

A farm wouldn’t be a farm without animals. From sheep to chickens to donkeys, there are a lot of helping paws, claws and hooves at P. Allen Smith’s Garden Home Retreat. In 2009, inspired by a childhood spent on the farm raising and showing livestock and poultry, Allen Smith founded the Heritage Poultry Conservancy, an organization dedicated to the preservation and support of all threatened breeds of domestic poultry. P. Allen Smith is an award-winning designer and lifestyle expert and host of two public television programs, P. Allen Smith’s Garden Home, P. Allen Smith’s Garden to Table and the syndicated 30-minute show P. Allen Smith Gardens.

More from Allen: http://www.youtube.com/pallensmith

Canadian Geese take over front yard suburban home in Asbury Park, NJ.

The Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) is a wild goose with a black head and neck, white patches on the face, and a brownish-gray body. Native to arctic and temperate regions of North America, it is occasionally found in northern Europe, and has been introduced to other temperate regions.

This species is native to North America. It breeds in Canada and the northern United States in a variety of habitats. Its nest is usually located in an elevated area near water such as streams, lakes, ponds and sometimes on a beaver lodge. Its eggs are laid in a shallow depression lined with plant material and down. The Great Lakes region maintains a very large population of Canada Geese.

In recent years, Canada Goose populations in some areas have grown substantially, so much so that many consider them pests for their droppings, bacteria in their droppings, noise, and confrontational behavior. This problem is partially due to the removal of natural predators and an abundance of safe, man-made bodies of water near food sources, such as those found on golf courses, in public parks and beaches, and in planned communities. Due in part to the interbreeding of various migratory subspecies with the introduced non-migratory Giant subspecies, Canada Geese are frequently a year-around feature of such urban environments.

Contrary to its normal migration routine, large flocks of Canada Geese have established permanent residence in Esquimalt, British Columbia, on Chesapeake Bay, in Virginia’s James River regions, and in the Triangle area of North Carolina (Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill), and nearby Hillsborough. Some Canada Geese have taken up permanent residence as far south as Florida, in places such as retention ponds in apartment complexes.

These geese really do not like having their pictures taken, and they have landed themselves on the RidicuList. For more CNN videos, visit our site at http://www.cnn.com/video/